Depth & Draft – House Rules for DW 2.0

DystopianWars

One of the members of my gaming group has put together a neat set of house rules to cover Depth and Draft of models around coastlines and in rivers.

This is a great set of rules and adds a level of realism that isn’t in the game while keeping it simple.

Big thanks for Luke Irwin for the rules – you can download the PDF here (House Rule – Depth and Draft) or from our Downloads page.

If you like these rules, why not drop a comment below and let us and Luke now.

Till next time, watch out for Exploding (RED) 6’s and those Submerged Rocks!

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A taste for Dystopia – Ewen

In the following series of articles we’ll have a brief look at what drew each of our contributors to the game and world of Dystopian Wars, what their first fleet was, and why…

Ewen:

The theme and models were a large part of what attracted me to the game. Dystopian Wars was one of a few games that I and a couple of others were deciding upon and it certainly made an impression. You can’t really go wrong with gigantic hyper-industrialised steampunk warfare. The models that you first see as you look into the game, like the Imperium Sky Fortress with the runway unceremoniously plonked on top of a blimp, seal the deal. The rule system covering all three theatres was also highly attractive. The possibilities posed by aerial, naval and land forces all mixing it up at once, with one system to rule them all… simply fantastic.

When it comes to gaming a tend toward the bit-whore end of the spectrum, if it looks good I must have it. This helped inform my choice of the Russians. There is something about their ships, not that others are lacking, but the up-armoured mass of weapons and smoke stacks, well they’re just great. The allied Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth Sky Fortress the Zamiec was far too damn sexy to pass up. The rest of the Russian Fleet could have looked like malformed jelly-babies and I still probably would have gone for them for that model alone. ‘Phwoar’ was the first word to spring to mind as I gazed upon its visage. ‘Daaaamn girrlll, you fine’ quickly followed. The rest is history.

I am currently salivating as I eye off various others fleets/box sets including: the Italians, Chinese, the imminent PLC air cadre (another Zamiec, why not?) and many more. Where I’ll end up who knows but its going to be a damn fine ride!

 kos2boro Tiksi

Zamiec

On the Dystopian Wars forum I go by Lord Flash Heart

A taste for Dystopia – Peter (Romerous)

In the following series of articles we’ll have a brief look at what drew each of our contributors to the game and world of Dystopian Wars, what their first fleet was, and why…

Peter:

It was mid to late 2011 and I had suddenly heard the news that 40K was heading for a 6th edition.  I had spent over a decade collecting almost every army and suffered through 3 edition changes.  The impending move to 6th edition was the last straw for me and I began looking around for another game.

I had recently (6 months ago) moved jobs and found a local independent gaming store nearby.  Stopping in one day I was looking through the shelves when I came across a rulebook called Dystopian Wars (1.0 edition).  It had an interesting cover, there was an armed blimp over 2 ships shooting at each other.  The rear cover showedanother blimp and a tank.  I asked the owner what this game was about and he mentioned it was a new one being done by Spartan Games.

I opened the cover and started looking through it – there were robots! – there were Airships! – there were all three theatres of war in the same game!  On the shelf was the starter boxes for Federated States of America (Federated! Alternative timeline! yes!) and the Empire of the Blazing Sun (more giant robots! squids! flying airfields!)  Within days I was a true child of Dystopian Wars.

So all my 40k armies were sold to make way for DW.  I was soon rewarded with the Prussian Empire but stayed away from the Britannia’s (to this day I’m not sure why but have since remedied that situation).  Soon after – Antarctica!  Then came France, followed by Russia.    Today I am a proud owner of almost every fleet Spartan Games makes (even the Invaders).

So why do I love this game so much?  I don’t think there is one reason why.  I love the game mechanics – especially the randomness that, given enough exploding 6’s, even a frigate can destroy a dreadnought (don’t laugh it has happened).  The models are absolutely beautiful and easy to paint.  Spartan Games is very proactive and listens to their customers.  Compared to other games it is cheaper to get into.  Victorian era/Steam-punk has always been a favourite gene of mine.

These days my greatest joy is being a Spartan Vanguard and introducing new people to the game.  There is nothing better than seeing the look on someone’s face when they first see the models, or play their first turn or say “no really, how much does it cost to start”.

As we head to 2014 I’m really looking forward to the V2.0 rules.  For those of you out there that complain about the 1.1 rulebook – go back and read the 1.0 rulebook – you’ll appreciate how far the rules have come.  I know I don’t have to hope that the game designers and testers get it right because, I feel, the game is already solid but a few tweaks wouldn’t go astray.

So welcome to everyone joining us on this site and hope to hear from many of you soon.

PS: Please enjoy a photo of some of my Federated States of America fleet – the first to be brought and painted.

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A taste for Dystopia – Reese

In the following series of articles we’ll have a brief look at what drew each of our contributors to the game and world of Dystopian Wars, what their first fleet was, and why…

Reese:

While I have been a tabletop gamer since I was barely tall enough to see over the tables themselves, and have tried quite a few systems in my time, none have caught my attention like Dystopian Wars and later Dystopian Legions. Steampunk has always been a favourite genre of mine, and when I stumbled across the Prussians (and more specifically, the Metzger) a few years back, I was almost immediately sold. As I started reading more and more into the world and the rules behind it, the deal was sealed. I just HAD to get into this game…

Prussians were my first fleet, as the idea of giant lightning bolt-hurling robots stomping across the battlefield, covered from above by zeppelins surrounded in a sparkling corona of voltaic death and filled with jetpack-equipped marines wielding tesla-lances just somehow clicked with me. Made it hard not to hum “Flight of the Valkyries” during games though, I must say…

However, while Prussians were my first love, once I saw the first renders of the Russians, I knew they had been displaced. Armour-plated to the max, strangely shaped hulls, generators that can allow shenanigans second only to the Covenant and massive guns crewed by vodka-soaked conscripts? Yes please! And then they added a giant land drill backed up by a land dreadnought?!? Whats not to love! Oh, wait, lets then bolt that drill to the front of a ship and cover it in mortars! YES! This is the fleet for Reese!

Needless to say, these are far from my only two fleets, and my collection tends to expand every time Spartan Games release more of their wonderful models. I’m still convinced it’s a conspiracy to replace all my precious money with resin models… Hopefully though, this tendency to impulse buy all of Spartans products will allow me to pass on my experiences, post many pretty pictures, and generally wax lyrical on the subject of Dystopian Wars and Legions here on this blog, with at least the appearance of knowledge on the subject.

At any rate, Reese out! You’ll all be hearing from me again soon enough. 🙂

Russian Navy Sample Prussian Navy Sample Prussian Army Sample Russian Army Sample

As taste for Dystopia – Giles…

In the following series of articles we’ll have a brief look at what drew each of our contributors to the game and world of Dystopian Wars, what their first fleet was, and why…

Giles:

I was looking for a miniatures game that would be inexpensive, relatively small scale and most of all fun.  The first thing that struck me about Dystopian Wars were the miniatures—these amazing ships and robots and flying craft; they just looked unbelievable on the table, high quality sculpts with a really appealing look to them.  The more I read about the system the more I loved the sound of it; that submarines, ships, aircraft, blimps, and massive tanks could all fit in the same rule system, and on the same table top at the same time, and more than that—that this was how the game had been designed? Well—I wanted in.  Of course it helped that the setting was full of conflict, ever changing alliances and mystery!

My first fleet was the Covenant of Antarctica, I absolutely loved the look of the models.  The Ptolomy Bombers and Epicurus Sky Fortress just looked amazing.  As I read the background of the nation: a place gentlemen-scholars gone to war, a secretive and technologically advanced nation—well, I was sold!

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A taste for Dystopia – Opening Salvo…

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It is 1870 and the world is at war.  Giant dirigibles, robotic contraptions, massive ships of war, monstrous submersibles and weapons that spit deadly fire, all fight for supremacy as the great nations of the world struggle for dominance.  All this unimaginable technology made deadly possible by the discovery of a new element: Element 270, or Sturginium, after it’s discoverer Lord Barnabus Sturgeon.  Sturgeon has yet more secrets to reveal, as deep in the Antarctican ice he and a team of explorers discovered the miraculous Wells Chasm, a repository of wildly fantastic technology left by no-one knows whom…

Dystopian Wars is a table top miniatures game that captures the action and heroism of this titanic world war.  Airborne, naval and land units clash in an epic game that covers three theatres of war.  It’s a game where a giant submarine can launch torpedos at the battleship that’s landing a heavy barrage of cannon fire on a floating sky fortress.  Where boarding assaults, ack-ack, fighter planes, and dive bombers all add to the fire.  Where a gigantic robot can punch holes in the superstructure of a submersible mechanical squid that is strangling it…