How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 2

The Base

The base of the model represents it’s position on the gaming table – touching the base is the same as touching the model; you’ll read in many miniature games the term “base to base contact” meaning when bases are touching.

Spartan Games really did us a favour when they were deciding on what type of bases to use for Dystopian Legions.  After  decade of 40k, I had enough of the flat top and angled sides of their bases.  Dystopian Legions use a base similar to Privateer Press Warmachine and Hordes game.  The base has a recessed top and most come with an open slot to place the model in (commonly referred to as a slotta-base)

To begin, take your metal model and after cleaning off any flash try to fit the bottom runner (the piece between the models feet) into the slot.  If it is too long, use a pair of clippers to carefully cut away some of the extra length.

Then, again carefully with your clippers, put a slight bend in the metal runner.  Take extreme care not to snap the runner or twist it so far that the models feet move inwards.  The bend should be no more than 2-3mm – this allows the model to be held firmly in the slot while stopping it from tipping over.

Once your happy with the position of the model add some glue (I use Zap-A-Gap) and secure the model to the base.  You also might want to keep the feet of your model slightly higher than the base, this will help with when you come to put terrain in the recessed area. You can see from the picture below the slight bend in the this models metal runner; holding it securely in place.

IMG_0161 copy

The next big decision is what to put in the recessed area of the base.  As it is recessed modelling sand or fine gravel and be used to represent the ground (and if you kept the feet slightly higher than the base it will look like the model is standing on top of the ground and not in it).

This part is only limited by your imagination so work out what common basing theme you would like through your force.  I use a combination of sand and rocks as I always image my guys slogging it over a battlefield rather and on a green grassy hill.  As well as the flock, I like to add some cut up plastic sprue; it makes for some interesting looking debris.

The picture below shows the use of sand, rocks and some plastic sprue.

IMG_0342

You might be wondering why I suggest to do the terrain before undercoating – this is a personal preference but I like to cover the sand in an undercoat spray to help reduce the chance of it coming off.  Besides, plain sand has a boring colour – towards the end of the painting blogs I’ll show you how a wash and drybrush can really bring it to life.

That’s it for this painting blog – in the next outing we’ll tackle undercoating and doing the boots on the model.  Until next time – watch out for those exploding 6’s!

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8 thoughts on “How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 2

  1. Pingback: How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 1 | Element270

  2. Pingback: How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 3 | Element270

  3. Pingback: How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 4 | Element270

  4. Pingback: How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 5 | Element270

  5. Pingback: How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 6 | Element270

  6. Pingback: How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 7 | Element270

  7. Pingback: How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 8 | Element270

  8. Pingback: How to Paint…. Dystopian Legion FSA Infantry – Part 9 | Element270

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